Logic on Advice From Big Sean, New Album & More (Video Interview)

We talk to Logic about learning from his idols, get him to reveal some new lines and more.
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The first thing you notice about Logic is that he looks young, remarkably young. The words "baby face" come to mind and you try to dismiss them, they're cliched and you're a writer who's supposed to be able to describe people originally, but nope, baby face really is the best description. The second thing you notice about Logic is that he's nice, remarkably nice. He keeps stopping to talk to fans, and not just in that cursory "Oh, thank you so much" quick handshake way you see from even the nicer artists. He really stops. Looks them in the face. Learns their name. Really talks to them, which is admirable and says something important about who he is as a person, you make a mental note to mention it in your article, but right now you also just need to start this interview. He's due to play the Soundset Festival in just minutes and there are so many questions you want to get in before his tour manager cuts off the interview to walk him onstage. It should be the reverse, but he seems supremely relaxed while you start to show signs of being under pressure. You can hear the clock ticking.  

Finally, you manage to maneuver him through a blanket of admirers, turn on the cameras and start talking. That's when shit gets good. Lately, you've been obsessed with how rappers hold their mic onstage—Black Thought holds his loosely like a cigarette, Ice Cube grips his like he's arm wrestling it—so you ask him about his personal mic-holding style. It turns out it's the kind of small detail he's thought about, studied, developed his own spin on, the same way he's intensely studied every facet of his favorite rappers. He's a true student of the game. 

For a guy wearing a NASA jacket, Logic seems remarkably down to earth, but especially after the critical and commercial response to his last album, Under Pressure, he's undoubtedly running in some higher circles these days. He's certainly had the opportunity to learn directly from some of those idols now, right? It made me think of his "conversations with legends, crazy how one day your idols can turn into your brethren" line. So who's really been able to put him on game? What lessons has he learned from those who have come before? 

Make no mistake though, while it'd be disingenuous for Logic to pretend like he has a "normal" life, he is just minutes away from getting onstage in front of thousands, he seems to genuinely have no interest in living anything close to the rockstar lifestyle. If you're looking to run into Logic on the red carpet or see him in the VIP section of the club, you're out of luck. He doesn't like that shit, he doesn't go outside. 

Sometimes when you're interviewing someone they'll drop a gem you almost can't believe they said out loud, only you have to keep your face calm so they'll keep talking. You don't want to scare them off the topic by acting like it's a big deal, so even though inside your brain is losing its shit, on the outside you keep it cool. That's what you felt like when Logic dropped that rap line; you literally can't think of another time any artist has ever just revealed a line they're thinking of using in a song. Most are far too protective of their writing to even dream of it, but Logic said it so casually you have to play along and see if you can get him to reveal more. 

Boom! Mission accomplished. And with that, the ticking clock inside your head starts ringing. Logic isn't showing any signs of rushing, he seems ready to talk for hours, but you're not about to be the reason he's late to the stage, and he's outside so rarely it seems selfish to hoard the chance for some more fans to express their gratitude. So you part ways, of course, Logic is exceedingly polite and appreciative as he leaves, and you have another level of respect for the man. That tends to happen when an artist goes from the idea of a person to an actual person, and Logic is now very much an actual person. A person who loves hip-hop, a person who's fighting to stay normal in the face of fame, a person who freaks out when Big Daddy Kane says he's a fan. A person who never goes outside and doesn't fuck with nobody. 

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