Bobby Shmurda on His Future: "They Ain't Never Gonna Take My Joy"

The New York rapper is staring at three more years in prison, but his resolve can never be broken.
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Bobby Shmurda went to jail before he had a chance to really explore the depth of his career. In late 2014, only a few months after releasing his breakout single “Hot Nigga”—a song that captured the heart of New York hip-hop and absolutely exploded into the national consciousness—he and a few of his GS9 crew members were arrested and subsequently indicted on conspiracy, gun, and drug charges. Last week (September 9), Shmurda and GS9 cohort Rowdy Rebel both took plea deals where each will get seven years, counting time served.

Since taking the deal, Bobby and Rowdy spoke with Complex for an exclusive interview, where the duo discussed their plans to continue making music and the details surrounding their cases. Bobby also revealed why he took the deal:

"I did it for Rowdy. They offered me five and offered Rowdy 12. They said the only way they’ll give him seven is if I took seven too. So, you know, I had to take one for the dawgs."

Still, even though Bobby and Rowdy felt like they were given an unfair trial because of racial disparities—Bobby asserted that the cops lied about seeing a gun in his hand and that the judge and jurors only saw them as “black thugs”—both were optimistic about their futures, especially Bobby.

“I’m rapping, I’m acting, I’m going to have some books out. I want people to hear my story, they’re gonna feel my pain. I have three years to make a book happen. I got love for 50 Cent, I got love for DMX, but my movie’s gonna be better than Get Rich or Die Tryin’ and Belly put together, and it’s gonna be a true story,” Bobby said. “They ain’t never gonna take my joy.”

The 22-year-old rapper also claimed he’s going to get his GED and a college degree while incarcerated. His resolve can never be broken.

“Whenever I’m in front of a judge, that shit makes my stomach hurt. But when I leave the courthouse my spirits pick back up. I've lost things bigger than my music career. I’m a real nigga from the streets. I done lost friends, so them doing this to me isn’t that big a deal to me. My pops is doing 120 years, I have friends doing life, I have niggas in the grave.”

What can be gleaned from the interview is that Bobby is looking toward the future—and that hope prevails. It’s an outlook that a lot of artists can learn from, especially those not in his position. To have gone through everything he’s gone through, to remain positive, and to believe in the prospects of his career in three years—one could only hope for that kind of attitude.

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