Migos Believe They Make “Generational Music,” Planning 20-Year Career “Like JAY-Z”

Migos have had an incredible year, but they're not getting wrapped up in current success.
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Migos have had an incredible run over the last year, topping charts and picking up plaques and selling out shows, but the Atlanta trio isn't getting wrapped up in their current success. Quavo, Offset and Takeoff are thinking long term—20 years down the line.

"In 20 years, from now, I think we'll have a real big impact on hip-hop," Quavo told XXL for their 20th Anniversary issue interview. "Stars on the walk of fame, we shall be inducted in the Hall of Fame—the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame—and, at that point, we should be getting paid off a lot of music that come through. All the songs that we've made, all the young artists will want to sample our music and songs."

Quavo's groupmates sat quietly for most of the interview, but Offset also chimed in to talk about Migos' bright future—a future that he believes includes JAY-Z-sized touring deals.

"20 years from now, we're still going to be in the game, like my boy JAY-Z. He's still dropping records that go Platinum, they give him 200 million on a tour deal," Offset said. "20 years from now, you ain't gon' say nothing because we fly with the music. People understand we got generational music. I don't feel like we gon' stop."

Considering Quavo has previously stated that Migos is responsible for changing hip-hop forever by creating a "whole new sound," no claim or boast from any of Migos' three members should be surprising, but are he and Offset right? Do the Migos make "generational music"? Will hip-hop fans still be listening to "Bad and Boujee" and "T-Shirt" in five, 10 or 20 years? How many hit singles are they going to need to manufacture over how many years before a nine-figure, Hov-esque touring deal with Live Nation is on the table?

While none of these questions could possibly be answered in the here and now, the future of Migos, as a group, obviously depends on their desire to continue making music as a collective. Twice during the interview, Quavo explicitly expressed the group's desire to remain together despite the solo success he has experienced away from Offset and Takeoff, but as we've seen over the years, from N.W.A and A Tribe Called Quest to OutKast and Goodie Mobb, even the most close-knit, brotherly groups eventual fracture.

Personally, I hope the three have a long and prosperous career together. But if they don't, I can still look forward to listening to "Versace" when I'm 53 years old by pressing play on my wrist and activating the speaker implant in my skull that replaces the need for headphones.

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