The Moment Logic Realized He Had Fans Was Also When He Knew He Deserved to Be Paid

“I couldn't believe that there were hundreds of people that had gathered just for me.”
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“I couldn't believe that there were hundreds of people that had gathered just for me.”

As part of his new spotlight feature on CBS News, Logic recently returned to Chicago venue Reggies, the venue he sold out his very first concert. Speaking with CBS correspondent Michelle Miller, the 27-year-old describes the night as the biggest moment in his career because it was the first time he understood he actually had fans.

“Being able to sell the spot out was, like, insane,” Logic explained to Miller. “I couldn't believe that there were hundreds of people that had gathered just for me.”

While the 400 standing room cap at Reggies pales in comparison to Logic’s most recent tour, which took him to the massive Red Rocks Amphitheatre, that sold-out crowd in Chicago cemented that he was not only deserving of his fans but also deserving of a check.

“I remember being 18 and rapping with a remote control in front of my mirror and pretending there were thousands and thousands of people there, and wishing ‘Man, if I could just go on tour as like an opening-opening-opening act for a rap group and not even get paid, I would just love it!’” Logic continued. “And that's the passion as an artist, and it's good that that's there, but… After a couple shows I'm like, this is cool, but I should be getting paid. Success is constantly growing. For every goal I achieve, I set ten more.”

For Logic, Reggies was a pivotal moment, when he realized he was done paying his dues. For aspiring artists, his realization should serve as an easy-to-follow guideline: if you have fans willing to see you perform live in concert, you deserve to get paid, period.

Of course, there is no specific milestone that dictates when any given artist is worthy of making money off their work. Logic could have had four people at his show, but if they approached his music with the same enthusiasm as those 400, something tells me he would have felt just as deserving.

Whether an artist's reach is 50 people or 50,000, as long as his or her work is truly connecting with an audience, it deserves to be valued as such.