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Lil Peep’s Producer Describes Peep’s Recording Process

“No one taught him anything. It was just his idea.”

Long live Lil Peep

The late rapper-singer’s first posthumous album, Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2, was released today, slotting in as an important fixture in Peep’s still-burgeoning legacy. Crafted for over a year by trusted collaborators, including producer Smokeasac, the album stands to represent everything Lil Peep stood for musically. Speaking with Complex, Smokeasac broke down Peep’s recording process.

“He wrote his songs fast,” Smoke said. He also revealed that much of Pt. 2 was recorded at the same time as Pt. 1. “It was interesting to me how he could write the progression from the hook to the verse to the pre-chorus, all this stuff. And he had it all in his head. Then he would layer his vocals himself. So he would do a hook, then he would layer the hook 12 times, and that's what gave him this super wide sound. No one taught him anything. It was just his idea. He mixed himself on GarageBand.”

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Lil Peep’s process should shock no one. The slapdash and visceral quality of his music is what garnered him such a massive following in the first place. The controlled chaos that informed his songwriting bled into the lyrics and informed his ability to blend genres with ease and foresight. In the spirit of the pop-punk bands he so obviously draws from, his DIY approach is both on-brand and endearing. Lil Peep was never anything other than entirely himself.

Yet, as Smoke describes, Peep was not simply firing in the dark. Layering his vocals and working quickly, Lil Peep knew what his sound was and worked tirelessly to refine it and reach the summit of his creative identity. Though his life was cut short before he reached the peak of himself, Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2 represents the massive strides Peep was taking.

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