Drake’s 50 Best Guest Verses, Ranked

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Drake’s 50 Best Guest Verses, Ranked

It’s been nearly ten years since Lil Wayne, on Birdman’s 2009 hit, “Money to Blow,” implored listeners not to worry about Cash Money’s future because the label would be all right as long as they “put Drake on every hook.”

Since then, Drake’s earned the right to be mentioned in the same breath as Rap’s Greatest Scene-Stealers ever—Busta Rhymes, André 3000, and Lil Wayne—as he’s swiped dozens of songs out from under artists on the strength of show-stopping guest verses.

Even more, a Drake feature practically guarantees you a hit: over the past decade, he’s guested on seven No. 1 singles on Billboard’s Hot Rap Songs chart (“No Lie,” “Moment 4 Life,” “Right Above It,” “Aston Martin Music,” “I’m On One,” “Say Something,” and “Only”), and 13 Top 10 hits on the Hot 100 (“Work,” “What's My Name,” “She Will,” “MIA,” “Look Alive,” “No Guidance,” “Going Bad,” “Yes Indeed,” “Right Above It,” “F***** Problem,” “Love Me,” “I’m On One,” and “Walk It Talk It”).

With his status as hip-hop’s Feature King unchallenged, here are Drake’s 50 best guest verses.

But first, a couple of notes before we begin:

  • We’ve omitted songs where Drake only sings the hook: Rick Ross’ “Diced Pineapples” and “Aston Martin Music”; Lil Wayne’s “She Will,” “Love Me,” and “With You”; Gucci Mane’s “Back on Road”; Tyga’s “Still Got It.”
  • Also ineligible are remixes that double as Drake freestyles: “We Made It,” “Paris Morton Music,” “Sweeterman,” “Tell Your Friends,” and “Freak N You.”

Without further ado...

50. Nicki Minaj — “Champion” ft. Drake, Nas & Young Jeezy

Album: Pink Friday: Roman Reloaded (2012)
Producer: T-Minus, Nikhil Seetharam

Two years before he was having tea with Erykah Badu on 2014 loosie “Days In the East,” Drizzy mentions that he used to stay with her in his verse on “Champion.” And while Jeezy might steal the show with his appearance, Drake delivers the more confident verse, reflecting on how he makes “hits in three acre cribs” and “stars outta basic bitches.”

49. PartyNextDoor — “Recognize” ft. Drake

Album: PartyNextDoor Two (2014)
Producer: PartyNextDoor

This is Peak Drake: In the span of two bars, he plans trips to Europe, then remembers his side piece’s Benz needs snow-equipped tires.

48. Preme — “DnF” ft. Drake & Future

Album: Dear America (2014)
Producer: Noel Cadastre & Noah “40” Shebib

You’d be remiss to bring up this verse around lyrical heads, but admit it: Drake’s performance on “DnF” is unbelievably catchy. Even more, it contains one of the best Sad Boy Drake sequences in his catalog.

47. Big Sean — “Made” ft. Drake

Album: Finally Famous... Vol. 3: BIG (2010)
Producer: Kanye West

In the summer of 2010, Big Sean should’ve known better than to request a feature from the Rap Rookie of the Year. Predictably, his decision backfired: Drake not only washed the Detroit rapper on his own song (“Made”), but arguably had the best overall verse on the entire mixtape. I wish I could say Sean learned his lesson, but considering what took place three summers later (Kendrick’s guest spot on “Control”), we both know the answer.

46. Rick Ross — “Gold Roses” ft. Drake

Album: Port of Miami 2 (2019)
Producer: OZ, Syk Sense, Vinylz, & The Rascals

Writing about the song in his review of Port of Miami 2, my friend Yoh said it best: “Drake has one of the most seamless deliveries in hip-hop. The words don’t have any weight, and his voice never fumbles the cadence. He steps into a particular zone. As a lyricist and performer, Drake must be considered a great rapper. The blasphemy line. The double-jointed line, too. Scorpion needed ‘Gold Roses’ more than Port of Miami 2.”

45. French Montana — “No Shopping” ft. Drake

Album: MC4 (2016)
Producer: Murda Beatz, Cubeatz

Congrats to Joe Budden for turning a one-sided war against Drake into the most unnecessary rap beef in recent memory. In the summer of 2016, their feud culminated in Drake sending multiple shots at Budden on French Montana’s “No Shopping.” In hindsight, these barbs overshadow Drizzy’s superb verse, which has earned its place in the canon of underrated Drake guest spots.

44. Bun B — “Put It Down” ft. Drake

Album: Trill OG (2010)
Producer: Boi-1da, D10

Nine years on, Drake’s verse on Bun B’s “Put It Down” has aged like fine wine. Following a couple of cringy lines early on (“I never cheat unless you count the girls I cheat on;” Homesick just when I thought I was sick of home”), Drake finds his sweet spot and begins rapping like the superstar he’d soon become.

43. Meek Mill — “Going Bad” ft. Drake

Album: Championships (2018)
Producer: Wheezy

Drake’s 2018 guest-appearance blitz will go down as one of the best in his career. After owning the winter with “Look Alive” and “Walk It Talk It,” the summer with “Yes Indeed” and “SICKO MODE,” and the fall with “Never Recover” and “MIA,” Drake still had enough left in the tank to supply his former rival, Meek Mill, with one of his best verses of the year on their reunion collaboration, “Going Bad.”

42. Jamie Foxx — “Fall For Your Type” ft. Drake

Album: Best Night of My Life (2010)
Producer: Noah “40” Shebib, Rico Love, & Drake

After spending 2010 singing hooks for A-list rappers like Birdman (“Money to Blow”), Lil Wayne (“With You”), and Rick Ross (“Aston Martin Music”), Drake capped off the year by flexing his versatility alongside an A-list R&B star. On Jamie Foxx’s “Fall For Your Type,” Drake’s closing verse introduced fans to the off-script, sing-song style he’s now known to implement when rapping over R&B beats.

41. Rihanna — “What’s My Name?” ft. Drake

Album: Loud (2010)
Producer: StarGate, Kuk Harrell

“Best I Ever Had” and “Find Your Love” may have been the first tracks that showcased Drake’s mainstream popularity, but his guest spot on Rihanna’s No. 1 hit, “What’s My Name,” proved he could be a pop-star in his own right.

40. T.I. — “Poppin Bottles” ft. Drake

Album: No Mercy (2010)
Producer: T-Minus, Nikhil Seetharam

On the No Mercy standout, Drake makes up for a lack of lyrics with a devastating flow, cementing his swag-soaked performance as one of the first iconic club bangers of his career.

39. Timbaland — “Know Bout Me” ft. Drake & JAY-Z

Album: Opera Noir (2013)
Producer: Timbaland & J-Roc

Timbaland’s “Know Bout Me” could’ve been another stellar collaboration between JAY-Z and Drake. Instead, Jigga merely spoke 16 words on the intro, “We gotta sell these bitches the dream, my n***a. N****s like Walt Disney around this bitch.” Thankfully, Drake made up for his counterpart’s no-show and went in with a double-time delivery on the second verse.

38. The Game — “Good Girls Go Bad” ft. Drake

Album: The R.E.D. Album (2011)
Producer: Cool & Dre

Despite being one of the cornier verses in his catalog, you’d be hard pressed to find another Drake guest spot as funny as his appearance on Game’s “Good Girls Go Bad.” The 16-bar verse is filled with hilarious quotables, from the opening lines (“Good evening, I’m in Chicago at the Elysian / With some girls that say they models but ummm, I don’t believe ‘em”) to his use of childhood TV references as pickup lines, to the way in which he tosses aside a former flame in brutally honest fashion.

37. Waka Flocka Flame — “Round of Applause” ft. Drake

Album: Triple F Life: Friends, Fans & Family (2012)
Producer: Lex Luger

Following his sympathetic verse about strippers on The Weeknd’s “The Zone,” Drake pivoted on Waka Flocka’s strip club anthem, “Round of Applause,” delivering the most malicious stripper tribute of his career. Backed by Lex Luger’s pulsating beat, Drizzy leaves his feelings at the door.

36. SBTRKT — “Wildfire (OVO Remix)” ft. Drake

Album: N/A (2011)
Producer: Jerome

On May 20, 2011, Drake posted a remix of SBTRKT’s “Wildfire” to his OVO blog. The track was quickly erased from our minds, however, when “Dreams Money Can Buy” arrived hours later. Eight years on, you won’t find many people who’re familiar with Drake’s verse on “Wildfire,” let alone aware of its greatness. This lack of recognition, though, is exactly what makes it such a rewarding listen.

35. Nicki Minaj — “Only” ft. Drake, Lil Wayne & Chris Brown

Album: The Pinkprint (2014)
Producer: Dr. Luke, Cirkut & JMIKE

Is it the strongest song by Young Money’s three-headed monster? Not a chance. But that doesn’t mean it’s not an entertaining listen, especially Drake’s verse, which is perhaps the funniest guest spot in his discography.

34. YG — “Who Do You Love?” ft. Drake

Album: My Krazy Life (2014)
Producer: Mustard

As someone who loves to ride the latest wave, Drake had no choice but to link up with 2014’s hottest rapper-producer duo, YG and Mustard, on the former’s hit single, “Who Do You Love?” After lacing the Bompton rapper with an excellent guest spot, though, Drizzy was forced to settle a dispute with Rappin’ 4-Tay, who called him out for biting his 1994 song, “Playaz Club.”

33. The Weeknd — “Live For” ft. Drake

Album: Kiss Land (2013)
Producer: The Weeknd, DaHeala & DannyBoyStyles

Nearly a year after linking up on Thursday standout “The Zone,” Abel and Aubrey joined forces for “Live For,” the fourth single from The Weeknd’s debut studio album, Kiss Land. Released in August 2013, a few weeks before the release of Nothing Was the Same, the sprawling cut found Drake assessing the competition.

32. Fetty Wap — “My Way (Remix)” ft. Drake

Album: N/A (2015)
Producer: NickEBeats, JayFrance & Micah Street

If you’re still not convinced of the power of the Drake co-sign: With this remix, Fetty became the first rapper to have his first four debut singles chart in the top 10 on the Hot Rap Songs chart simultaneously: "Trap Queen" (No. 2), "My Way" (No. 3), "679" (No. 5), and "Again" (No. 8).

31. DJ Drama — “We in This Bitch 1.5” ft. Drake & Future

Album: Quality Street Music (2012)
Producer: Kane Beatz & JMIKE

Occasionally, Drake is capable of stealing a song on the strength of his charisma. DJ Drama’s “We In This Bitch 1.5” is one of those rare instances, as Drizzy needs just one minute to set the tone and hijack the song, with a lively opening sequence.

30. The Weeknd — “The Zone” ft. Drake

Album: Thursday (2011)
Producer: Doc McKinney & Illangelo

The first collaboration between The Weeknd and Drake on one of Abel’s projects, “The Zone” lived up to the potential the duo displayed on Take Care standouts “Crew Love” and “The Ride.” “The Zone” sees The Weeknd set the stage for Drake’s big entrance. From there, Drizzy offers up the most gentle verse about a strip club ever laid to wax.

29. Lil Wayne — “It’s Good” ft. Drake & Jadakiss”

Album: Tha Carter IV (2011)
Producer: Cool & Dre

This song is remembered for Lil Wayne’s subliminal shot at JAY-Z, but Drake has the best verse on the collab. The Boy’s appearance is a short one, but it hooks you immediately, before it ends with him announcing Wayne’s return home in triumphant fashion.

28. Mary J. Blige — “Mr. Wrong” ft. Drake

Album: My Life II… The Journey Continues (Act 1) (2011)
Producer: Jim Jonsin & Rico Love

It’s easy to forget from 2009 to 2011, Drake was the Best R&B Guest Rapper Alive, scoring features with everyone from legends Mary J. Blige (“The One”), Alicia Keys (“Un-thinkable (I’m Ready)”), and Jamie Foxx (“Digital Girl,” “Fall For Your Type”), to present-day superstars like Chris Brown (“Deuces (Remix)”), Sean Garrett (“Feel Love”), and Trey Songz (“I Invented Sex,” “Unusual”). His second collab with the Queen, “Mr. Wrong,” remains his most underrated R&B feature to date.

27. Fabolous — “Throw It In the Bag (Remix)” ft. Drake & The-Dream

Album: N/A (2009)
Producer: Tricky Stewart & The-Dream

Long before he’d declare his intent to give Halle Berry a baby on 2013’s “Versace (Remix),” Drake professed his love for older women on the remix to Fabulous’ 2009 hit single, “Throw It In the Bag.”

26. Travis Scott — “SICKO MODE” ft. Drake & Swae Lee

Album: Astroworld (2018)
Producer: Hit-Boy, OZ, Tay Keith, Cubeatz, Chahayed & Mike Dean

If Drake was properly credited, there’s a good chance “SICKO MODE” would rank inside the top 10. Not that it matters much, considering his opening and closing verses are arguably the highlights of the ASTROWORLD standout.

25. Aaliyah — “Enough Said” ft. Drake

Album: N/A (2012)
Producer: Noah “40” Shebib

In order to appreciate the overlooked greatness of this 2012 loosie, let’s ignore the fact that Drake is listed as the featured artist on an OVO-sanctioned, posthumous Aaliyah single. Backed by 40’s smoky, after-hours R&B production and the late singer’s silky falsetto, Drizzy unleashes one of his classic confessionals.

24. Game — “100” ft. Drake

Album: The Documentary 2 (2015)
Producer: Cardo & Juliano

Twenty-six days before Meek Mill would kick-off the biggest rap beef this decade, Drake was already on the defensive. When listening to his verse on “100,” you don’t have to read between the lines. He sounds exhausted while reflecting on his position atop hip-hop, and the incessant threats that come with it. And yet, Drizzy still appears unfazed, too busy making his circle smaller to concern himself with opposing forces on the horizon.

23. A$AP Rocky — “F**kin’ Problems” ft. Drake, Kendrick Lamar & 2 Chainz

Album: Long.Live.ASAP (2013)
Producer: Noah “40” Shebib

Released in October 2012, “Problems” wasn’t just the year’s most star-studded posse cut, but also a changing of the guard moment for hip-hop. At the time, Rocky was two months away from dropping his debut album; 2 Chainz and Kendrick were fresh off releasing theirs. And then, of course, you had Drake, who was just hitting his prime. While it’s debatable which rapper had the best verse, there’s no denying Drizzy came off as the biggest star of the bunch.

22. Lil Reese — “Us (Remix)” ft. Drake & Rick Ross

Album: N/A (2012)
Producer: Young Chop

By the fall of 2012, Drake was amidst a flawless streak of guest spots: Rick Ross’ “Stay Schemin’,” DJ Drama’s “We In This Bitch 1.5,” Nicki Minaj’s “Champion,” 2 Chainz’s “No Lie,” French Montana’s “Pop That,” Meek Mill’s “Amen,” Aaliyah’s “Enough Said.” As if that wasn’t already one of the greatest runs by a featured rapper, Drizzy made sure to earn more street cred points that October, when he hopped on to the remix to Lil Reese’s “Us”.

21. Birdman — “Money to Blow” ft. Drake & Lil Wayne

Album: Priceless (2009)
Producer: Drumma Boy

Fresh off a summer in which he catapulted to superstardom on the back of a handful of hit singles (“Best I Ever Had,” "Successful,” “Forever”), Drake proved he possessed the Midas touch on the fall 2009 anthem, “Money to Blow,” which, of course, is remembered for Lil Wayne’s prophetic line: “We gon’ be alright if we put Drake on every hook.”

20. Tinashe — “2 On (Remix)” ft. Drake & OB O’Brien

Album: N/A (2014)
Producer: Mustard, Redwine & DJ Marley Waters

Drake ran the rap game in 2014 solely on the strength of one-off singles. Take a moment and look at this murderer’s row of hits he released between December 2013 and October 2014: “0 to 100/The Catch Up,” “Tuesday,” “Draft Day,” “Trophies,” “Wade Made It,” “Days in the East,” “How Bout Now,” “6 God,” and “Heat of the Moment.” I mean, good God. Perhaps the greatest testament to Drake’s unbelievable run that year is that “2 On/Thotful” is probably the eighth best song in the group.

19. ILOVEMAKONNEN — “Tuesday” ft. Drake

Album: ILoveMakonnen (2014)
Producer: Sonny Digital & Metro Boomin

Built around Sonny Digital and Metro Boomin’s syrupy beat and iLoveMakonnen’s Auto-Tune-enhanced vocals, “Tuesday” provided Drake an opportunity to step out of his comfort zone. By delivering perhaps the best vocal performance he’s ever laid to wax, Drake helped “Tuesday” go viral, which in turn, minted Makonnen a star and gave the most boring day of the week new meaning.

18. Kendrick Lamar — “Poetic Justice” ft. Drake

Album: good kid, m.A.A.d city (2012)
Producer: Scoop DeVille

The Kendrick Washed Drake on Take Care camp (via his scene-stealing guest spot on “Buried Alive Interlude”) seem to have forgotten that The Boy returned the favor on Kendrick’s debut album, good kid, m.A.A.D city. Drake’s appearance on “Poetic Justice” might not jump out at you, but when stacked against either of Kendrick’s verses on the song, it’s obvious who comes out on top.

17. Nicki Minaj — “Moment 4 Life” ft. Drake

Album: Pink Friday (2010)
Producer: T-Minus

This supposed to be y’all year? We ain’t get the memo,” Drake raps on “Moment 4 Life,” a highlight from Nicki Minaj’s debut album, Pink Friday. At the time, you couldn’t blame Young Money’s roster for feeling themselves. In the fall of 2010, the label boasted the Best Rapper Alive, Lil Wayne, along with the Rap co-Rookies of the Year, Drizzy and Nicki, both of which released their debuts within five months of one another.

16. Alicia Keys — “Un-thinkable (I’m Ready) (Remix)” ft. Drake

Album: N/A (2010)
Producer: Alicia Keys, Kenny Brothers Jr. & Noah “40” Shebib

For someone who, in recent years, has been clowned for their immaturity and inability to grow as an artist, it’s easy to forget that there was a time when Drake seemed wise beyond his years. This verse is enough of a reminder, as a 23-year-old Drizzy voices his inner fears about partying too much and not finding the right woman.

15. Lil Wayne — “Believe Me” ft. Drake

Album: N/A (2014)
Producer: Vinylz & Boi-1da

Five years after Lil Wayne told listeners, on “Money to Blow,” not to worry about Cash Money’s future because the label would be alright as long as they "put Drake on every hook,” Drake continued his mentor’s prophetic claims on “Believe Me.” From the jump, Drizzy assumes the role of host to the welcome-back party, rolling out the red carpet for his Big Homie, with one of his best guest spots this decade.

14. Big Sean — “Blessings” ft. Drake

Album: Dark Sky Paradise (2015)
Producer: Vinylz & Allen Ritter

Big Sean dropped “Blessings” on January 30, 2015, exactly two weeks before Drake would surprise-release If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late. In hindsight, his verse here gives us a taste of the subject matter he’d visit on IYRTITL: Feuding with YMCMB over unpaid royalties, worrying about his mother, throwing shade at the press, and, of course, repping the 6.

13. Lil Wayne — “Right Above It” ft. Drake

Album: I Am Not a Human Being (2010)
Producer: Kane Beatz

If I Am Not a Human Being was Lil’ Wayne’s pre-prison curtain-call, then “Right Above It” was his victory lap. Backed by triumphant production courtesy of Kane Beatz, Drake, the Rap Rookie of the Year, delivered a career-defining guest verse that marks the moment the torch was passed between the Young Money President and his protégé.

12. BlocBoy JB — “Look Alive” ft. Drake

Album: Simi (2018)
Producer: Tay Keith

Considering that the best part of Drake’s guest appearance on “Look Alive” is the infectious hook, you could argue that his eight-bar verse doesn’t deserve to be ranked this high. In this case, however, Drake does such an excellent job blending the hook and his first verse together, that you have no choice but to consider them one and the same.

11. 2 Chainz — “Big Amount” ft. Drake

Album: Daniel Son; Necklace Son (2016)
Producer: Buddah Bless

On “Big Amount,” Drake raps circles around 2 Chainz without even breaking a sweat. His verse is so effortlessly executed that it’s easy to miss how casually arrogant it actually is. And yet, once his calm, cool and collected delivery wins you over, don’t be surprised if you find yourself admiring each arrogant boast.

10. Meek Mill — “Amen” ft. Drake

Album: Dreamchasers 2 (2012)
Producer: Key Wane & Jahlil Beats

Backed by a gospel-clapping, organ-laced piano loop, there’s no denying fans were shocked to hear Meek rap over a beat so far out of his wheelhouse, so effortlessly. In an alternate universe, we might remember “Amen” for Meek’s jubilant hook. Unfortunately for Meek stans, though, The Boy showed up and stole the song while operating on cruise control.

9. 2 Chainz — “No Lie” ft. Drake

Album: Based on a T.R.U. Story (2012)
Producer: Mike Will Made It

Fresh off his show-stopping guest spots on Kanye West’s “Mercy” and Nicki Minaj’s “Beez In the Trap,” 2 Chainz entered the summer of 2012 as the hottest feature in hip-hop. Then, in an admirable move in the spirit of competition, Drake reclaimed the title by dusting Tity Boi on the Atlanta rapper’s debut single, “No Lie.” Thanks to his contagious hook and instantly-quotable verse, the banger was inescapable that summer.

8. Rick Ross — “Made Men” ft. Drake

Album: Ashes to Ashes (2010)
Producer: 2 Tall Beats

After spending the fall of 2010 handing out guest verses to R&B singers such as Jamie Foxx (“Fall For Your Type”), Tank (“Celebration”), Rihanna (“What’s My Name”), and Trey Songz (“The Usual”), Drake needed to raise his street cred. So, that December, he hopped on one of the hardest beats he’d ever come across, then proceeded to murder the hardest rapper alive, Rick Ross, on his own shit.

7. PARTYNEXTDOOR — “Over Here” ft. Drake

Album: PartyNextDoor (2013)
Producer: PartyNextDoor

The most underrated verse of Drake’s career is a victim of circumstance. Released the same day as “Versace (Remix)”—only one of the two or three best guest verses in his catalog—“Over Here” remains criminally overlooked in the canon of Drizzy features. Backed by a murky beat courtesy of PND and 40, Drake’s double time verse makes you feel like you’re sitting shotgun in his Bugatti while he navigates through the streets of Toronto.

6. Future — “Sh!t (Remix)” ft. Drake & Juicy J

Album: N/A (2013)
Producer: Mike WiLL Made-It

Released in December 2013, Future’s “Sh!t (Remix)” arrived just three months after Drake released the biggest album of his career, Nothing Was the Same. But rather than celebrating his recent coronation on his first post-NWTS verse, Drake warned the rest of hip-hop that his reign was just beginning. Over Mike WiLL Made-It’s thumping beat, he sounds hungry as ever, yet is well aware of his unchallenged place atop the rap game.

5. DJ Khaled — “I’m On One” ft. Drake, Lil Wayne & Rick Ross

Album: We the Best Forever (2011)
Producer: T-Minus, Noah “40” Shebib, & Kromatik

Drake already had a flawless streak of guest spots (from “Money to Blow” and “Say Something” in 2009, to “Made Men” and “Right Above It” the following year), but never had he swiped a song out from under the headlining artist as effortlessly as he did on DJ Khaled’s summer anthem. When Drake wraps up his opening verse around the two-minute mark, the song is already his, completely.

4. Kanye West — “All of the Lights (Remix)” ft. Drake, Lil Wayne & Big Sean

Album: N/A (2011)
Producer: Kanye West

In August 2010, an early version of “All of Lights” leaked, featuring Drake rapping over Kanye’s triumphant beat. Three months later, however, Drizzy was noticeably absent from the official version. In interviews, Drake stressed that he was okay with Kanye’s decision; his tone on the unofficial remix, however, argued otherwise. Released in March 2011, Drake’s verse on the “All of the Lights” remix serves as our introduction to the tough guy persona he’d tap into later that year on Take Care.

3. French Montana — “Pop That” ft. Drake, Rick Ross & Lil Wayne

Album: Excuse My French (2013)
Producer: Lee On the Beats

Fresh off delivering two of the year’s best guest verses, on Rick Ross’ “Stay Schemin’” and 2 Chainz’s “No Lie,” Drake laid claim to summer 2012 on French Montana’s banger, “Pop That.” In hindsight, Drizzy’s scene-stealing verse is a perfect snapshot of where he was at in his life at that exact moment.

2. Migos — “Versace (Remix)” ft. Drake

Album: N/A (2013)
Producer: Zaytoven

After owning the previous two summers on the strength of stellar guest spots (2011’s “I’m On One” and 2012’s “Pop That”), Drake did it again in 2013, with an earth-shattering guest verse on the remix to Migos’ then-bubbling hit, “Versace.” Six years on, it’s impossible to measure how impactful Drizzy’s verse was, considering it helped catapult the Atlanta trio to superstardom.

1. Rick Ross — “Stay Schemin’” ft. Drake & French Montana

Album: Rich Forever (2012)
Producer: The Beat Bully

With no disrespect to DJ Khaled’s “I’m On One,” Drake’s guest verse on Rick Ross’ “Stay Schemin’” is the moment when he snatched the throne for good. By flaming rap vet Common in the opening bars, The Boy proved that he was about that action. If it’s not the best guest verse of his career, it’s surely the most important.

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