4 Fresh Songs (& An Album) You Might Have Missed (10/27)

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Welcome back to "Might Have Missed," and this time we've got new music from Bambu, Snoh Aalegra and much more. But first, a refresher for those who are new.

I want y'all to be locked into The DJBooth at all times. Not just because every pageview matters, but because we post a lot of new music and the thought of you missing your new favorite song keeps me awake at night. I get paid to do this, so it's easy for me to listen to everything we feature, but for you, a student or an adult with a job that isn't as absurd as music writer, I know it's hard to stay that glued to The DJBooth. No worries, we've got you covered.

Here is some of the particularly fresh DJBooth-featured material from the past seven days or so that you might have missed, with an emphasis on the indie and underground (because it's a lot harder to miss the superstars). You can thank me later.

Kyle Woods - Let You In

I hadn't before heard Kyle's work, so I went into this record expecting him to sing and/or rap. He didn't. Never fear though because Keiya handles the vocals expertly. As for Kyle, while he doesn't say a word, he certainly makes his presence known thanks to some stellar boardwork. Both Kyle and Keiya have a certain subtle potency to them and it gives this song such a great vibe. Keiya doesn't hit any Mariah Carey-esqe notes and Kyle's production isn't that complicated - sure there are subtle little touches here and there but it's not overwhelming and frantic- but this song still packs a big punch; you can't stop listening once it starts. Two for one effort here, I found a great producer and a great singer to keep an eye on thanks to this great, under-the-radar effort.

Jared Evan & Statik Selektah - Scene

Yo, the fact that more people aren't talking about the upcoming Statik/Evan Still Blue album is a goddamn rap travesty. I just can't fathom how an an album with such a talented, young rapper/crooner and one of hip-hop's best producers isn't on everyone's Must-Have list. How can you not love this record, no matter where your musical preferences may lie? I may have featured this duo a few weeks ago, but there are no rules against featuring the same artist again, especially when the pair are still being slept on like Rip Van Winkle after a lean binge with ScHoolboy. Evan's has an easy-listening, golden voice and Statik does an amazing job of keeping the beats pure, undoctored hip-hop yet still form fitting them to his collaborative partner's unique skillset. This project is going to be amazing and yet the world is going on as if it doesn't exist. It's my job to put a stop to it. Listen to this. Now!

Ground Up - On Me

Sometimes it takes a whole song to realize thar it's "Might Have Missed"-caliber and other times I know literally two seconds in. Ground Up's "On Me" is the latter. As soon as those flutes began fluting I knew this was going to be a delight, and sure enough it was (word to the producer, Bij Lincs). I love how the flutes really drive the song, but it still maintains a tough, gritty vibe. Normally flutes are all butterflies and pixie dust but here, juxtaposed with some rugged bard and crackin' drums, it really gives this song some pop. Azar and Malakai share a similar style on the mic. Both are abrasive and have some real punch, but there is an understated, unique charisma in their flows and it makes "On Me" very flavorful.

Kwamie Liv - Just a Gigolo/Sky's the Limit

I don't want to get too ahead of myself, but Kwamie Liv's latest work might be one of my favorites recordings of the year. How good is it? Well, there is a jazz inspired remix of Biggie's "Sky's The Limit" (one of my favorite B.I.G cuts) and it isn't even the best part. It feels like a little bonus to an already substantial track. How original is this?!?! It feels weird using that word for a song that is both a cover and a remix, but I haven't heard anything like this all year. I mean Louie Armstrong and Biggie ON THE SAME TRACK?! Get the fuck outta here! A million points to producer BABY DUKA, who lays down some amazing boardwork here. Kwamie is quite impressive vocally as well. She sounds straight out of 1930, with her smoky vocals; they are absolutely made for this kind of song. These days when an artist tries their hand at jazz, they don't really capture the genre's essence. But Kwamie nails it. I'm blown away at how authentic her sound is; I feel her voice in the depths of my soul. This effort is OUTSTANDING! I will definitely have this on repeat for weeks to come. I can't see it ever getting old.

Bambu - Party Worker

Man. Bambu is the realest. Truth be told, I kind of forget to listen to him as much as I should because, whenever I do listen, I am always left satisfied. The man makes nothing but authentic, headnodic hip-hop. The thing I love about Bambu the most, though, are his lyrics. They are meaningful and impactful, but not too preachy thanks to real charisma, charm, and a natural energy. (He doesn't yell at you to prove he's passionate.) It is substantive yet goes-down easy, and it makes you feel like a better human being. It gives you the nutrients of a salad but the joy of eating a 16 oz Porterhouse.

[Lucas Garrison is a writer for DJBooth.net. His favorite album is “College Dropout,” but you can also tweet him your favorite Migos songs at @LucasDJBooth.]

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