Meet Sebastian Sartor: The Man Behind "King Push"

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When I first started listening to rap, I though the rapper did it all, from writing, to rapping and beat making. The idea of someone else creating the beat never crossed my mind, but later came to find out that pretty much every rap song out there was produced by someone other than the emcee himself; I’d imagine (and hope) I wasn’t the only one who thought this way.

Now, I actually consider myself more producer-oriented, a good beat can make or break a song for me regardless of who is rapping over it, so I am always bothered by hip-hop constantly overlooked the producer. Beat makers are a lot like the offensive line of a football team. You wont ever see an O-lineman’s jersey in the crowd, nor do they get the endorsements, commercials, and fame—all of that goes to the quarterback (the rapper)—but without the lineman, the quarterback couldn’t do his job. There are the most important people on the football field but if you asked 80% of fans, I doubt they could name the whole line.

So what does this have to do with anything? Well,

Nathan talked about it yesterday

, but Pusha T essentially had no idea who produced “King Push” which blew my mind. It was rumored to be Joaquin Phoenix, but we alter found it was some 23-year-old named Sebastian Sartor, who happens to be the step son of Metallica drummer Lars Urlich. You have probably seen his name around the past few days, but other than “King Push” have you heard anything else by him? Didn’t thinks so.

That’s where I come in--voice for the voiceless--I did some digging and found his Soundlcoud in case you were curious to see what else the mastermind behind that awesome beat could come up with. Here are a few of his cuts (

the rest are here


Sorry to disappoint you staunch hip-hop heads, but “King Push” is about as hip-hop as it gets. Pusha took a page from Danny Brown’s book and grabbed an electronic-based producer for the beat. I think some of you will like it and some won’t. There are bits and pieces I like but as a whole its just not my thing. The crazy thing about is all this is that his Soundcloud is looks just like any other amateur producer out there and the guy only has about 300 twitter followers.

I know Sartor’s dad is Lars Urlich (fun fact his mom was in "Gladiator") and everything but it is still pretty astounding that a virtually unknown producer can end up with a production credit on one of the biggest albums of the year.